Cercospora On White Oak

Cercospora Leaf Spot On Rose

Cercospora Leaf Spot On Rose Leaf

Are you seeing a decline in your shade and ornamental trees? A fungus called Cercospora Leaf Spot could be to blame.   Although the fungus can affect a wide range of ornamental plants and trees, our Arborists report seeing Cercospora Leaf Spot mostly on White Oaks this summer. However, that does not mean your other trees and shrubs can’t contract the fungus. It’s best to keep an eye out for the symptoms of Cercospora Leaf Spot throughout your entire landscape.

What To Look For:

The disease begins as a small spot on the leaves. As the disease progresses more spots appear until the leaf ceases to function as the site of the tree’s food production process and falls off of the tree.

If not treated the infected tree could suffer massive leaf drop leaving your tree looking dead and unsightly throughout the remainder of summer and fall. Trees that have contracted Cercospora leaf spot this year also have a higher risk of contracting it next spring/summer since the fungus typically overwinters in leaf piles and re-infects your trees/shrubs during the next spring.

Treatment Options:

Luckily Cercospora Leaf Spot can be treated by a Certified Arborist with fungicide treatments. If you think your trees or shrubs have Cercospora Leaf Spot book a consultation with one of our Certified Arborists and receive a customized treatment plan for your tree.

How To Prevent Cercospora Leaf Spot:

  • Locate trees, shrubs, and other ornamentals in an area with good air circulation. This will help to keep fungal diseases that flourish in close, hot environments at bay.
  • Prune your trees and shrubs to stimulate increased air circulation and to allow the leaves to dry quickly after it rains.
  • Do not over water your trees and shrubs. Learn how to water properly by reading our watering tips article.
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Samantha Huff

Samantha Huff is the marketing coordinator at RTEC Treecare. She enjoys learning about the technical aspects of trees and the insects and diseases that prey on them. She hopes that these articles can help homeowners gain control of their tree and shrub maintenance by being aware of the signs and symptoms of unhealthy trees.

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